News and Views

 
  • Genes influence brain cortex structure

    Genes influence brain cortex structure

    Evidence for a genetic influence on a brain structure critical to intelligence was reported Monday in a study by Norwegian and UC San Diego researchers. Researchers found that changes in the thickness of the brain’s cortex, the seat of cognition, are linked to its genetically determined organization.

     
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  • A group of Marines are seen on patrol with members of the Afghan army, on November 17, 2010.

    Reduced Heart Rate Variability May Indicate Greater Vulnerability to PTSD

    ​A prospective longitudinal study of U.S. Marines suggests that reduced heart rate variability – the changing time interval between heartbeats – may be a contributing risk factor for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

     
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  • PsychArmor Institute: Press Conference and Open House

    PsychArmor Institute: Press Conference and Open House

    CESAMH’s Associate Director of Education and Dissemination, Dr. Carie Rodgers, speaks to elected officials, military, regional Veteran wellness community, and business representatives about the need to serve Veterans who do not receive care at the VA.

     
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  • Serving Those Who Serve

    Serving Those Who Serve

    The University of San Diego (USD) School of Leadership and Education Sciences (SOLES) hosted its first “Serving Those Who Serve: Improving Mental Health Care for Service Members and Their Families” summit on July 10, 2015.

     
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  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Linked to Accelerated Aging

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Linked to Accelerated Aging

    In recent years, public health concerns about post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have risen significantly, driven in part by affected military Veterans returning from conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere. PTSD is associated with [a] number of psychological maladies, among them chronic depression, anger, insomnia, eating disorders and substance abuse.

     
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  • Gene Networks for Innate Immunity Linked to PTSD Risk

    Gene Networks for Innate Immunity Linked to PTSD Risk

    Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in New York and the United Kingdom, have identified genetic markers, derived from blood samples that are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The markers are associated with gene networks that regulate innate immune function and interferon signaling.

     
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  • San Diego Scientists Link Genes With PTSD, Before And After War

    San Diego Scientists Link Genes With PTSD, Before And After War

    Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and the UC San Diego School of Medicine were part of a team that studied 188 Marines before and after deployment.

     
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  • A VA San Diego Healthcare System researcher shows a Veteran how to use an electronic screening tablet during a military muster at Camp Pendleton on Dec. 8. Testing is currently being conducted to assess the benefits of incorporating newer technology to help treat younger Veterans. Photo by Christopher Menzie.

    Advances in Technology Serving Veterans

    A research team led by Niloo Afari, PhD, and James Pittman, LCSW, at the VA Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH), has developed and tested a new web-based, mental health screening process for Veterans.

     
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  • Seeking New Coping Tools for Veterans with TBI

    Seeking New Coping Tools for Veterans with TBI

    One of the most effective tools to manage a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a smartphone calendar app, say VA researchers. Considered the signature injury of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, mTBI can result in memory loss, mood disturbances and other potentially disabling symptoms. For some, the injury can prove life-altering.

     
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  • (Photo by Sgt. Pete Thibodeau/USMC

    What the heart can tell us about the mind: Heart rate variability and PTSD

    A car’s ability to stop and start—to accelerate on demand and then idle at a stoplight without trouble—are measures of its health. A car that stalls or jerks is a sure sign of trouble. So it goes for the human heart and, according to a study of 2,430 Marines, heart rate variability can tell a lot,

     
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  • Col. Vincent Mysliwiec, a sleep medicine specialist with 121st Combat Support Hospital, Brian Allgood Army Community Hospital in Yongsan, South Korea, strongly discourages looking at the clock while sleeping. (Courtesy photo by 8th Army)

    Fear, Safety and the Role of Sleep in Human PTSD

    The effectiveness of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment may hinge significantly upon sleep quality, report researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System in a paper published today in the Journal of Neuroscience.

     
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  • Local Vets Cope with Challenges of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Local Vets Cope with Challenges of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Once a soldier, George never expected some of his hardest battles would be fought after […]

     
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